Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Deep Tissue Massage


Have you been a little too zealous with your spring cleaning? Have you discovered some muscle aches since getting back into your garden after winter? Perhaps deep tissue massage is what you need. Deep tissue massage is massage of the deep tissue structure of the fascia (connective tissue) and muscles. Deep tissue massage can release muscle tension and chronic knots. It is good for scar tissue from previous injuries; sometimes even eliminating them.


Muscles that are stressed hinder nutrients and oxygen from going where they need to go. This causes inflammation and allows toxins to build up causing pain and stress. Deep tissue  massage breaks up and releases toxins so the blood and oxygen can circulate throughout the body. Being properly hydrated is very important.

Some folk like to soak in a warm bath with Epsom salt after their massage. This helps get more of the toxins out of your body. For chronic knots, you also need to incorporate exercise, correct posture and relaxation techniques if you want to get the full benefit of your massage. Don't do any strenuous activities on the day you have your massage, do the exercise on another day. 

Deep tissue massage helps with chronic muscle pain and injury rehabilitation from motor accident injuries.It can also be helpful with arthritis and the related inflammation.

For more valuable information on other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com 

Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

This blog was written and adapted  for Dori White, LMT  by Herbalist Valerie Lull, MH. To read Valerie’s blog ‘Simple Ways to Stay Healthy’ go to www.vallull.blogspot.com

Thursday, March 26, 2015




Cupping – An Effective Therapy for Pain 





There is an amazing new therapy that therapists in North America are learning and it is proving to be highly effective. The effects are long lasting, and many people describe it as miraculous. This new therapy is called cupping.

Massage cupping combines massage movements and negative pressure with the use of a suction device on the skin. A cup is positioned at the area to be treated and a vacuum is created within the cup to draw the skin and underlying tissue into the cup. The vacuum creates a suction effect that increases the circulation of the blood and lymph to the local area that is being treated. It relaxes muscle tissue, and draws the toxins out of the body. This releases many of the pain causing factors.

The suction can be light or heavy. This, along with the movements performed and the area being treated will produce a stimulating or sedating effect. It is important that the therapist be able to assess the condition of the client before the procedure so that the proper application of the cups will produce a positive outcome. The therapist will ask relevant questions before the procedure so they will know how to proceed.

Cupping is a powerful therapy that can relieve the client of pain and toxic overload. It can also feel great. The pulling action engages the parasympathetic nervous system allowing a deep relaxation of the body.


For more valuable information on other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com


Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

This blog was written and adapted  for Dori White, LMT  by Herbalist Valerie Lull, MH. To read Valerie’s blog ‘Simple Ways to Stay Healthy’ go to www.vallull.blogspot.com

Tuesday, March 24, 2015


Massage for Veterans



Our veterans give a lot in defense of our country and not all of them come home with good psychological or physical health. There are many forms of bodywork and massage is one way we can help our wounded veterans recover and live meaningful lives.

Massage is good for the mind as well as they body and it is a great way to help these returning soldiers integrate back into society. The therapeutic touch helps with physical wounds, and the psychological benefits are great too. Research on veterans and the use of massage seems very promising.  A study done in 2014 shows that after massage, veterans experienced a significant reduction in pain, tension, anxiety, and depression. In cases of amputation, massage helps with edema, neuromas, skin problems and scar tissue.

During the first visit to a massage therapist there will be an intake process that will help the patient have a good session. The therapist will want to talk about the extent of the injuries and the medical procedures they have had done. Ongoing health issues will be addressed and the therapist will ask for a list of medications that are currently being taken. Be sure to communicate with the therapist if the room is too hot or the pressure is too hard. The session can be ended if things get too intense or a break is needed.

There are a number of bodywork therapies that can be helpful to veterans. These include craniosacral therapy, reflexology, breath work, reiki, myofascial release, trauma touch therapy and yoga.

If you are a veteran with physical problems or if you know someone who is a veteran with problems, you might suggest they see a massage therapist. For more valuable information about massage and other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com



Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

This blog written by herbalist Valerie Lull, MH. To read Valerie's blog 'Simple Ways to Stay Healthy' go to www.vallull.blogspot.com

Thursday, March 19, 2015


Cupping for Deep Tissue Release



  
Massage cupping is a form of therapeutic bodywork that is used to facilitate deep tissue release and aid in bringing about numerous healthful benefits to the body, such as:

  • Enhanced flexibility
  • Lymphatic/blood circulation
  • Tissue nourishment
  • Body detoxification.

  How is the Technique Performed?

Massage cupping is performed by applying ‘reverse pressure’ to the body, via glass or plastic suction cups that are generally placed or massaged along problem areas, in the direction of natural lymphatic flow.

  • Suction cups may be magnetic or non-magnetic, with positive & negative poles, to help enhance the tissue-healing process. 
  • Sessions are typically 10-20 minutes in length, and can be integrated with traditional massage therapies.

Goals & Benefits

  • The technique namely focuses on reducing stagnation & restrictions in problem areas, by breaking down adhesion's/knots, and by helping to increase fluid (i.e., blood & lymph) circulation.
  • Massage cupping helps to reduce the build-up of cellular waste, toxins, inflammation, & excess fluids by assisting in dragging them from deep within muscles/soft tissue, to the body’s surface, where they can be more efficiently disposed of, via the lymphatic system.
  • More specifically, the massage cupping technique assists in …
                           Clearing stagnation
                           Relieving inflammation
                           Draining/Moving fluids
                           Sedating the nervous system
                           Expelling congestion
                           Stretching muscle & connective tissues
                           Loosening adhesions & scar tissue
                           Nourishing blood supply to the skin


Contraindications

  • Massage cupping is not to be used with excessive exfoliation.
  • Clients must avoid exposure to excessive heat (shower, sauna, etc.), cold, or exercise after cupping sessions (for at least 4-6 hours)
  • Clients should drink sufficient amounts of water subsequent to cupping sessions.
  • Massage cupping should not be used on clients with:
                                   Pace makers or
                                   Electrical implants,
                                   Low Blood Pressure
                                  Energy Depletion (Exhaustion), or Clients who are Pregnant

  • Cupping must also be used with caution on children, the elderly, diabetics, and persons with varicose veins.

Massage Therapist Dori White has the following training credentials:
Advanced training received from the
 International Cupping Therapy Association(ICTA)
Certification Program "Contemporary Cupping Methods"
Advanced Modules "Advanced Cupping Techniques"
Advanced Modules "Facial Rejuvenation"

For more valuable information on other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com

Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

Adapted for Dori White LMT by Herbalist Valerie Lull MH. To read Valerie's blog 'Simple Ways to Stay Healthy' go to vallull.blogspot.com 

Tuesday, March 17, 2015



Massage for Prevention





Massage is great for pain, carpal tunnel syndrome and many other physiological problems.  But once the pain is gone people often think all is finished and don’t come back. Massage is great for relieving pain, but it is good for preventive therapy too.

Massage can help build up your body and mind, combat stress and help your immune system to stay strong. Massage can keep on doing good things for you, even after the pain is gone. Perhaps you should think about massage for preventive care.

Massage can be part of a good health regimen. Along with a good diet, exercise and supplements, massage can be a part of a healthy lifestyle. One of the benefits, according to Benny Vaughn, an expert from Fort Worth, Texas, one benefit of regular massage therapy is better flexibility. He says ”the person becomes more aware of her body’s movement in space and becomes more aware of tightness or pain long before it reaches a critical point of mechanical dysfunction.”

Massage for prevention helps you to be in tune with your body. You can become aware of stress going on in your body and get relief before it causes damage.  The more massage you get, the more benefits you get. People who get massage regularly notice a reduction in pain and muscle tension. It can also improve their posture. Massage and bodywork can help to rebalance your body.

Scientists have found through doing many studies that massage decreases cortisol and increases dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitters that have to do with emotional well-being. Research also shows that massage can lower your heart rate and blood pressure naturally without having to result to medications. However if you are taking medications, do not go off them without consulting your health care provider.

Massage is a great therapy that helps heal body, mind, and spirit. Think of the sessions as a mini vacation. It should be a part of everyone’s health care routine.





Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

This article was adapted by herbalist Valerie Lull, MH. To read Valerie’s blog Simple Ways to Stay Healthy go to www.valerielull.com . 

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Massage Cupping








"Massage Cupping", "Cupping Therapy", "Chinese Cupping", "Vacuum Cupping", "Suction Cup Therapy"  It goes by many different names.  But what is it??

Cupping can be defined in many ways but simply put... cupping is negative pressure, rather than tissue compression.  It is superior  body work for pain, stubborn conditions, repetitive strains, inflammation, toxicity, chronic fatigue, digestive problems, scar tissue  and a slough of other issues we confront through day to day life and as we grow older.

By creating suction and negative pressure, this amazing therapy releases rigid soft tissue, drains excess fluids and toxins, loosens adhesions, lifts connective tissue, and brings blood flow to stagnant skin and muscles. Myofascial release is immediate and correct application of massage cupping  addresses a myriad of debilitating and stubborn conditions. Restructuring of the myofascial bands are possible with cumulative treatments, and there is no form of lymphatic stimulation and drainage that even approaches the efficacy and speed that suction can achieve.

This remarkable therapy employs negative pressure, rather than tissue compression, for superior results in the wide array of bodywork techniques. Suction cup therapy is a traditional, time-honored treatment that remains favored by millions of people worldwide because it's safe, comfortable and remarkably effective for many health disorders. The value and efficacy of this therapy has been documented through several thousand years of historical, clinical and subjective research. Now, with the influence and growing popularity of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ayurveda and other influential healing methodologies - Cupping has re-emerged in the Western Holistic Community as a subtle, remarkably effective healing therapy.


For more valuable information on other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com

Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

Adapted for Dori White by herbalist Valerie Lull, MH. To view Valerie's blog 'Simple Ways to Stay Healthy' go to www.vallull.blogspot.com 

Tuesday, March 10, 2015


Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Bodywork Treatment Proves Successful
Cathy Ulrich
It started as a vague feeling of numbness in her thumb and first two fingers, then progressed slowly to a definite tingling that woke her several nights a week. "It's not so bad on weekends when I have a chance to rest my arms, but it's now getting in the way of things I like to do at home," says Marie, who spends long hours during the work week typing at her computer keyboard. "I love to knit and cook, and I've had to curb these activities, as well."



Diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, Marie displayed the classic symptoms: soreness in her forearms, pain in her hands at the end of a long day at the computer, and a feeling of tightness that had spread from hands and wrists all the way to her elbows. And recently, she'd been getting headaches.

Marie has a couple of different options for treating the problem. "My doctor tells me he can operate, but the surgery isn't always successful," she says. "He recommends I try bodywork first."

Because Marie does the same motion in the same way many times a day over a long period of time, she has literally worn out the tissues involved in that motion. This type of injury -- called a repetitive strain injury, or RSI -- creates tiny tears in the fibers of the soft tissues of the body. While they don't immediately cause loss of function, these micro-tears set up conditions for chronic inflammation that will eventually manifest as pain, soreness, tightness, tingling, and burning.


CTS The hand and wrist combination work together as an amazing, mechanical anatomical wonder. Imagine a set of ropes and pulleys that travel from the elbow through the wrist to the finger tips. The muscles reside in the forearm, moving the fingers via long tendons that run through channels in the wrist. The nerves that send and receive sensory and motor information from the brain run alongside the tendons through these same channels.

When bending or straightening a finger, these tendons slide back and forth, just like cables. When continually working at a keyboard and using the same motion in the same position thousands of times a day -- like millions of Americans do -- the cables begin to wear. And just like threads in a rope, some of the collagen fibers will tear. This process progresses until enough fibers are torn that the body develops inflammation in the tendons and sheaths. Swelling ensues, which pinches the nerves, producing the classic symptoms of tingling, swelling, and even loss of grip strength.


The Bigger Picture The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome may reveal an even bigger problem. The nerves that carry sensory and motor information to the hand arise from the spinal cord in the neck, travel under the collar bone, through the armpit and elbow, all the way to the wrist. A nerve can become entrapped at the neck, shoulder, elbow, or wrist, and an impingement in any of these places can have a cumulative effect on the tingling felt in the hands. These entrapments are usually caused by poor postural habits. The soft tissues become shortened around habitual positions of rounded shoulders and forward head from working long hours at the computer and the channels where the nerves travel through the shoulders and arms can close down. Sound familiar?


Can Bodywork Help? A recent study conducted at The Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami School of Medicine looked at the efficacy of bodywork in treating carpal tunnel syndrome. Researchers found that after the completion of four massage sessions, the participants experienced an improvement in grip strength and a decrease in pain, anxiety, and depression. Participants also showed improvement in specific medical tests used to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome.

This landmark study verifies what bodyworkers have observed clinically for years: Massage -- and especially deep tissue techniques, such as neuromuscular therapy, Rolfing, and Hellerwork -- can reorganize the connective tissue fibers, break up scar tissue, and reduce or eliminate the cause of inflammation. Soft tissue work helps realign these tiny fibers of the tendons and sheaths, and the body can then heal itself -- and ease or even eliminate carpal tunnel syndrome.

Bodywork to the entire arm, shoulder, and neck will also free soft tissues where hidden tightness can contribute to the problem. Soft tissue inflammation can travel through the continuous connective tissue framework from fingertips to head and even cause headaches -- as was the case with Marie. Massage can restore these tissues to normal function.


Other Considerations In addition to bodywork, it's important to evaluate postural habits, work station positioning, and movement patterns. When workers become so focused on their work that they forget their bodies, they tend to maintain positions that contribute to the cause. It's important to identify several ways and several positions to accomplish the same thing. Moving the mouse from one side to the other, even during the same day, can help prevent fatigue and tissue failure. Wrist rests and keyboard trays are important, and a regular stretching routine is essential.

Finally, along with exercise and good nutrition, include bodywork as part of your regular health maintenance program. Regular massage reduces connective tissue inflammation and prevents scar tissue from forming. Movement education, such as the Alexander Technique, Feldenkrais Method, structural integration, and Trager Approach can help correct postural issues that also contribute to the problem. Bodywork is a treatment of choice to keep carpal tunnel syndrome from slowing you down.





For more valuable information on other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com

Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

Adapted for Dori White by herbalist Valerie lull. Read Valerie's blog 'Simple Ways to Stay Healthy' at www.vallull.blogspot.com

Monday, March 2, 2015




Making the Most of Your Massage
How to Prolong the Benefits of Bodywork
Barbara Hey

A massage works in wonderful ways, easing stress and pain, calming the nervous system, increasing circulation, loosening tight muscles, stimulating internal organs, and enhancing skin. The multiplicity of physiological responses sends a simple, clear message to the mind: Massage feels good. Of course, you want to hold on to that just-had-a-massage feeling -- total body relaxation, muscles relaxed and at ease, and fluid movement restored -- for as long as possible. 


But how long that bliss lasts depends on the state of your body. If you're suffering from chronic pain or recovering from injury, then it may take more sessions and perhaps different modalities before optimal health is restored. 

If massage is part of your regular health regimen, then it's more likely the effects will endure. In other words, the effects of massage are cumulative, like any healthy habit. The more often you get a massage, the greater and longer-lasting the benefits. 


Massage Frequency How often you receive massage depends on why you're seeking massage. In dealing with the general tension of everyday commutes, computer work, and time demands, a monthly massage may be enough to sustain you. On the other hand, if you're seeking massage for chronic pain, you may need regular treatments every week or two. Or if you're addressing an acute injury or dealing with high levels of stress, you may need more frequent sessions. Your situation will dictate the optimum time between treatments, and your practitioner will work with you to determine the best course of action. 

"You need to consider how you felt before the session and how you felt after, and then look at how long you maintain that," says Pieter Sommen, the chair of the eastern department in the Swedish Institute School of Massage Therapy in New York. 

In general, experts say "regular" is preferable, but how regular depends on your situation. While daily massage would be delightful, practical considerations such as cost, time, and physical need likely determine the frequency of treatments. "It's best to maintain a schedule," says Dori White, LMT, a Massage & Cupping Therapist in Portland Oregon  "That way the body becomes conditioned and prepared for session at specific intervals."


Maintenance Whether you get a massage weekly, monthly, or just every once in a while, the following habits can maximize and extend the afterglow of treatment.

Water One bit of advice you'll hear over and over again is to drink plenty of water after a massage. Bodywork -- no matter the particular modality -- releases toxins, such as lactic acid and carbonic acid, that need to be flushed from the body. Massage also promotes circulation, increasing blood flow and oxygen and stimulating the lymphatic system, which helps rid the body of pathogens. After-massage hydration supports these functions, helping to eliminate released impurities, sooner rather than later. It's also a great idea to prepare for your massage by upping your water intake prior to your session.

Stretching Another helpful habit is stretching between massages to maintain joint mobility, prevent muscles from tightening up again, and keeping the life energy flowing. This may mean doing yoga or whatever specific or full-body stretches suggested by your practitioner.

Exercise Working out can also help maintain the benefits of massage, and this habit should be continually cultivated. However, if you're receiving massage therapy to help speed muscle strain recovery, you may need to ease up on the exercise for a while and give the body time to heal -- particularly if you're recovering from a strenuous body-pummeling training regimen. "You don't want to over-work your body,"

Body Awareness After a massage, respect how your body feels. If your body seems to ask for rest, give in to that demand. This may mean backing off the to-do list, taking it easy, moving slower, and perhaps doing less for a while. And don't allow yourself to get fatigued because it will undermine the effects of massage. Get sufficient sleep to allow the body to absorb the effects and regain vitality.

Diet Finally, since you've just rid the body of toxins, support the body's renewed state by adhering to a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables and protein, which will continue the detoxification process. Lay off the espresso and all adrenaline-challenges for a time -- which would short-circuit relaxation anyway -- and enjoy the calm.

The benefits of massage are many, including: increasing circulation, allowing the body to pump more oxygen and nutrients throughout the body; stimulating lymph flow and boosting immunity; relaxing overused or tight muscles; increasing joint mobility and range of motion; reducing recovery time after strenuous workouts or surgery; and relieving back pain and migraines, just to name a few.

After receiving a massage, clients feel rejuvenated, relaxed, and refreshed. By opting for a few lifestyle choices, you can extend these benefits and get the most out of your massage.
 For more valuable information on other health tips please visit my website at www.DoriWhiteMassageTherapy.com
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Dori White, LMT Since 1998
www.doriwhitemassagetherapy.com
www.facebook.com/DoriWhiteMassageTherapy

Dori White - Founder & Owner of Cupping Portland
www.cuppingportland.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Cupping-Portland/1483422865259570

Dori White - Co-Owner & Founder of Portland Wellness Professionals
http://www.portlandwellnessprofessionals.com
https://www.facebook.com/PortlandWellnessProfessionals

Adapted for Dori White by Herbalist Valerie Lull. Read Valerie's blog 'Simple Ways to Stay Healthy' at www.vallull.blogspot.com